PCSSD - 4.35 Student Medications

4.35 Student Medications

Prior to the administration of any medication, including any dietary supplement or other perceived health remedy not regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration, to any student under the age of eighteen (18), written parental consent is required. The consent form shall include authorization to administer the medication and relieve the Board and its employees of civil liability for damages or injuries resulting from the administration of medication to students in accordance with this policy. All signed medication consent forms are to be maintained by the school nurse.

Unless authorized to self-administer, students are not allowed to carry any medications, including over-the-counter (OTC) medications or any dietary supplement or other perceived health remedy not regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration while at school. The parent or legal guardian shall bring the student’s medication to the school nurse. When medications are brought to the school nurse, the nurse shall document, in the presence of the parent, the quantity of the medication(s). Each person present shall sign a form verifying the quantity of the medication(s).

Medications, including those for self-administration, must be in the original container and be properly labeled with the student’s name, the ordering provider’s name, the name of the medication, the dosage, frequency, and instructions for the administration of the medication (including times). Additional information accompanying the medication shall state the purpose for the medication, its possible side effects, and any other pertinent instructions (such as special storage requirements) or warnings. Schedule II medications that are permitted by this policy to be brought to school shall be stored in a double locked cabinet.

The only Schedule II medications that shall be allowed to be brought to the school are methylphenidate (e.g. Ritalin or closely related medications as determined by the school nurse), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), and amphetamine sulfate (e.g. Adderall or closely related medications as determined by the school nurse).

For the student's safety, no student will be allowed to attend school if the student is currently taking any other Schedule II medication than permitted by this policy. Students who are taking Schedule II medications which are not allowed to be brought to school shall be eligible for homebound instruction if provided for in their IEP or 504 plans.

The district’s supervising registered nurse shall be responsible for creating both on campus and off campus procedures for administering medications. 

Students who have written permission from their parent or guardian and a licensed health care practitioner on file with the District may:

  1. Self-administer either a rescue inhaler or auto-injectable epinephrine;
  2. Perform his/her own blood glucose checks;
  3. Administer insulin through the insulin delivery system the student uses;
  4. Treat the student’s own hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia; or
  5. Possess on his or her person:
  1. A rescue inhaler or auto-injectable epinephrine; or
  2. the necessary supplies and equipment to perform his/her own diabetes monitoring and treatment functions.

Students who have a current consent form on file shall be allowed to carry and self-administer such medication while:

  • In school;
  • At an on-site school sponsored activity;
  • While traveling to or from school; or
  • At an off-site school sponsored activity.

A student is prohibited from sharing, transferring, or in any way diverting his/her medications to any other person. The fact that a student with a completed consent form on file is allowed to carry a rescue inhaler, auto-injectable epinephrine, diabetes medication, or combination does not require him/her to have such on his/her person. The parent or guardian of a student who qualifies under this policy to self-carry a rescue inhaler, auto-injectable epinephrine, diabetes medication, or any combination on his/her person shall provide the school with the appropriate medication, which shall be immediately available to the student in an emergency.

Students may be administered Glucagon, insulin, or both in emergency situations by the school nurse or, in the absence of the school nurse, a trained volunteer school employee designated as a care provider, provided the student has:

  1. an IHP that provides for the administration of Glucagon, insulin, or both in emergency situations; and
  2. a current, valid consent form on file from their parent or guardian.

When the nurse is unavailable, the trained volunteer school employee who is responsible for a student shall be released from other duties during:

  1. The time scheduled for a dose of insulin in the student’s IHP; and
  2. Glucagon or non-scheduled insulin administration once other staff members have relieved him/her from other duties until a parent, guardian, and other responsible adult or medical personnel has arrived.

A student shall have access to a private area to perform diabetes monitoring and treatment functions as outlined in the student’s IHP.

Emergency Administration of Epinephrine

The school nurse or other school employees designated by the school nurse as a care provider who have been trained and certified by a licensed physician may administer an epinephrine auto-injector in emergency situations to students who have an IHP developed under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 which provides for the administration of an epinephrine auto-injector in emergency situations.

The parent of a student who has an authorizing IHP, or the student if over the age of eighteen (18), shall annually complete and sign a written consent form provided by the student's school nurse authorizing the nurse or other school employee certified to administer auto-injector epinephrine to the student when the employee believes the student is having a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction.

Students with an order from a licensed health care provider to self-administer auto-injectable epinephrine and who have written permission from their parent or guardian shall provide the school nurse an epinephrine auto-injector. This epinephrine will be used in the event the school nurse, or other school employee certified to administer auto-injector epinephrine, in good faith professionally believes the student is having a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction.

The school nurse for each District school shall keep epinephrine auto-injectors on hand that are suitable for the students the school serves. The school nurse or other school employee designated by the school nurse as a care provider who has been trained and certified by a licensed physician may administer auto-injector epinephrine to those students who the school nurse, or other school employee certified to administer auto-injector epinephrine, in good faith professionally believes is having a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction.

The school shall not keep outdated medications or any medications past the end of the school year. Parents shall be notified ten (10) days in advance of the school’s intention to dispose of any medication. Medications not picked up by the parents or legal guardians within the ten (10) day period shall be disposed of by the school nurse in accordance with current law and regulations.

 

Legal References:

  • Ark. State Board of Nursing: School Nurse Roles and Responsibilities
  • Arkansas Department of Education and Arkansas State Board of Nursing Rules Governing the Administration of Insulin and Glucagon to Arkansas Public School Students with Diabetes
  • A.C.A. § 6-18-707
  • A.C.A. § 6-18-711
  • A.C.A. § 6-18-1005(a)(6)
  • A.C.A. § 17-87-103 (11)
  • A.C.A. § 20-13-405

Date Adopted:  4/10/18